Scientific Advisory Committee

Our multisensory learning software combines the latest findings from developmental psychology and neuroscience with tried-and-tested computer science principles for the modelling and analysis of learning (“student modelling” and “learning analytics”). As such, the programs were developed in collaboration with neuropsychologists, computer scientists and educational professionals and offer a unique and individualised way of supporting the brain with vital learning and maturation processes. The research carried out in parallel with Calcularis and Orthograph – and their ongoing further development – guarantee learning at the highest level and based on the most cutting-edge scientific findings.

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Prof. Dr. Markus Gross

ETH Zurich, Department of Computer Science

Prof. Dr. Gross is Head of Institute for Computational Science and the Laboratory for Computer Graphics in the Department of Computer Science at ETH Zurich (Swiss Federal Institute of Technology Zurich). Prof. Gross has been conducting research into the areas of image generation, computer graphics, image processing, modelling, simulation and computer games technology for more than 30 years. Most recently, he has focused on the use of multimedia technology for the alleviation of learning difficulties and the mathematical modelling of human learning behaviour. He serves as Dybuster's guiding mentor and holds seats on the advisory boards of numerous international research institutes and regional authorities.

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Prof. Dr. Lutz Jäncke

University of Zurich, Department of Neuropsychology

Prof. Dr. Jäncke's scientific work is focused primarily on the functional plasticity of the human brain, which he explores using modern imaging technology (functional magnetic resonance imaging, electroencephalography) and transcranial magnet stimulation. To date, Prof. Jäncke has published more than 150 original works in scientific publications and has had his works listed in the Essential Science Indicators database. He is currently among the 1% most frequently cited academics in the world. Alongside his original scientific works, he has published more than 150 chapters and multiple books.

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Prof. Dr. Michael von Aster

DRK-Kliniken (German Red Cross Clinics) Berlin | Children's Hospital Zurich, Department of Neuropsychology and Child and Adolescent Psychiatry

Prof. Dr. von Aster's research interests lie in clinical neuropsychology, the development of neurocognitive components in relation to academic abilities and diagnostic instruments for the diagnosis of learning difficulties. Prof. von Aster is one of the best-known and most respected dyscalculia researchers in the German-speaking world. His most recent research was able to establish cortical changes in children with dyscalculia on the basis of computer-based training. Prof. Dr. von Aster is also the author of the dyscalculia diagnosis test "Zareki".

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Prof. Dr. Martin Meyer

University of Zurich, Department of Neuropsychology

Prof. Dr. Martin Meyer is a professor at INAPIC, the International Normal Aging and Plasticity Imaging Center. His research interests lie, among other things, in the question of how and why the human brain created speech over the course of evolution, how one or more languages develop in the human brain, what enables the brain to master the complexity of language and how the ageing brain copes with language skills. In 2010, he was awarded the joint UBS and University of Zurich prize for his post-doctoral thesis on functional and structural hemisphere asymmetry in relation to speech functions. Dr. Meyer has been a guest professor at the Psychological Institute of the University of Klagenfurt since 2009.

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Dr. Severin Klingler

Post-Doc Department of Computer Science, ETH Zürich

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Dr. Tanja Käser-Jacobi

Postdoctoral Researcher, Stanford University